I recently faced an unusual issue with the default button to "insert an external link into Text field". This is for Sitecore.NET 9.2.0 (rev. 002893). Everytime I clicked on the web editor ribbon button, I got "Value cannot be null:html". You are hence not able to proceed at all. Here I will show you an alternate approach to it.


 

As you know, you can reset an item's presentation settings from the menu "Presentation/Reset" in the content editor. Consider a situation where there are tons of items and sub-items, and you suddenly realize that you will need to configure some item level security settings. It would have been nice, if similar to presentation settings, there was a "reset" option for security settings as well, so that you only need to specify the needed security settings at the template standard values level and then propagate the configuration to the tons of items/sub-items. I am going to discuss that today.

 


Sitecore commerce has its own set of indexes called the CatalogScope, OrderScope and CustomerScope. If we want to perform a search on these index, we can use some of the ootb commands. For example, if there is a need to lookup a sellable item entity id by display name, we can query the Solr documents in the CatalogScope index. This blog explains how to make calls to solr from a Sitecore Commerce pipeline block


 

Few years ago, I had written a blog on how to quickly view the actual physical file location of a presentation rendering/sublayout from within presentation settings of a sitecore item in content editor (View presentation control code path). That was on Sitecore 8.1. As mentioned there, it is very useful especially when you are mid-way in a Sitecore project or are in the process of reviewing client's existing Sitecore project. 

Today I am going to talk about viewing the presentation file location from within Sitecore 9.2 experience editor itself.


Have you ever needed to apply different styles based on the number of elements that exist in a particular group? Some developers might immediately turn to JavaScript in order to count the number of HTML elements. Then they might conditionally add or remove a class in order to apply different styles. However, JavaScript isn‘t actually needed, and in this post I'll show you how you can leverage CSS to accomplish this task.


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